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H & R Daniel

 

Makers of the finest late Regency Porcelain

Dear David and Tony Shaw,

I would like to thank you for your very interesting and informative website that I found while browsing the internet a few months ago. I was immediately drawn to the superb style and decoration of Daniel porcelain, so much so that I have since managed to acquire a few pieces to start my own small collection.

My latest find was, would you believe, at a local car boot sale when I came across these three pierced Daniel plates. Your website was invaluable in confirming their identity once I got home. I have bookmarked your website on my iPad and will be sure to have it to hand when I'm looking to add further to my collection. How did we ever manage with cumbersome reference books?

Sadly, the three plates are a little damaged, but for what I paid for them I'm still delighted, and now eagerly and regularly search my local antique fairs and shops, and of course car boot sales, with my trusty iPad at the ready.

Again, many thanks for leading me to a fascinating new interest.

Best wishes,

G. Sedgwick.

Carshalton, South London.

 

In the 'Backstamp section' on this website we have shown a recently found mark for the little known company of Daniel & Cork. This backstamp, and the earthenware tankard on which it was found, can be seen below.

The death of Henry Daniel in 1841, to be followed within a few scant years by the financial failure of his son Richard did not result in the name of Daniel fading completely from the list of North Staffordshire makers of ceramics.

At the start of the second half of the 19th century a somewhat little known Daniel potter was operating from the New Wharf Pottery in Burslem. Sadly very few examples of the glazed and transfer printed earthenware that was being produced from around 1860 by this Joseph Daniel still exist.

However, for a relatively short time Joseph Daniel was in a partnership with a William Cork, and fortunately we recently acquired a sample of the output from this joint venture, which is a simple glazed earthenware 5” high tankard, decorated by coloured transfer in the style of a Chinese scene, but very importantly displaying a back-stamp showing that this item was made by ‘Daniel & Cork’ with the style of decoration labelled as ‘Nankin’.

This rare find immediately prompted a spate of research into this D&C partnership in general, and into Joseph Daniel in particular. Unfortunately the substantial effort put into this research is not entirely reflected by a proportional amount of uncovered information.

The ‘Post Office Directory of Staffordshire’ for 1868 lists several entries for Joseph Daniel, Earthenware Manufacturer, at New Wharf, Burslem, and also Navigation Road, Burslem, with similar entries in Kelly’s 1868 Trade Directory. In the local ‘Staffordshire Sentinel’ newspaper in June 1867 there appeared a notice of the ending of the partnership between Joseph Daniel and William Cork by mutual agreement. The above mentioned trade entries show that Joseph Daniel ‘soldiered on’ alone for at least twelve months following the winding-up of the Daniel & Cork venture. (See also inserts below)

You may have noticed that in the above Post Office Directory, page 778, there is immediately above Joseph Daniel another Daniel. This John Coates Daniel was well known around the Potteries, not as a potter but as a general entrepreneur, with such eclectic interests as a supplier of materials into the pottery industry, as a Shipping Agent for exports to the Americas and Australia, Land Agent, Stock Broker and proprietor of a Brick Works, and this is to mention just a few of the dozen or more of his ‘irons in the fire’.

John Coates Daniel was a direct descendant of the many generations of Burslem potters, as was the above mentioned Joseph Daniel, that stretched back in time to at least as far as John Daniel of Burslem, who is recorded as a ‘Potter’ in circa 1550.

(We will not be expanding on the exploits of J.C. Daniel, even though he was my GG Grandfather, and add another Great for David)

 

Tony Shaw

 

A Recent Discovery or Items For Debate?

 

It was difficult to decide under which heading to enter this article, either would appear to be appropriate.

The generally accepted reference book on Daniel Teaware unfortunately does not show an illustration of Daniel pattern 5000, it does however give a brief description:

 

'5000. A green ground and enamelled fruit. Shell pierced dessert ware'.

 

Compare this with the photographs shown below of a very pretty Shell pattern cup and saucer that was one of four idendical duo's that was recently acquired. The majority of the pieces clearly display the pattern number 5000 on the undersides.

 

David Shaw

The partial tea service pictured here was aquired by myself at a local antiques fair mixed in with a Coalport service in similar colours but with a slightly different pattern.

 

The service shows no signs of wear and appears to have spent its entire life in a cabinet (although it did have a few stickers to show that it had recently been purchased at auction by the dealer).

 

The shape is in Second Bell, but the pattern is very similar to the rare Wadey Shape pictured below. The main difference between the two, apart from the shape and the occasional flower, is that the painting is on the inside of the Second Bell cups. My only regret is that none of the pieces have pattern numbers.

 

David Shaw

As to the history of the set I am afraid I can say very little. My daughter and I were astonished to find it all piled up (sacrilege!) in the window of a second hand shop just 2 days ago and while there has been some old damage to the jug, bowl and 2 of the coffee cups, tea cups and saucers, there are 4 perfect trios and both the cake plates are perfect. The sugar basin has a hairline fracture on the base, but it is so rare to find any antique porcelain, let alone something as spectacular as this here we were thrilled to get all the pieces for $80AUD (about 43 pounds) and watched in horror as the assistant insisted in roughly bundling it up in newspaper lest more of the handles broke off!. Someone has obviously paid to have the broken pieces professionally restored at some point so must have known its value once.

 

Kindest regards and best wishes,

Tim Parish (Australia)

Copyright © 2013 Tony and David Shaw. All rights reserved.

This work is registered with the UK Copyright Service. Registration number: 284680406

Copyright © 2013 Tony and David Shaw. All rights reserved.

This work is registered with the UK Copyright Service. Registration number: 284680406

As to the history of the set I am afraid I can say very little. My daughter and I were astonished to find it all piled up (sacrilege!) in the window of a second hand shop just 2 days ago and while there has been some old damage to the jug, bowl and 2 of the coffee cups, tea cups and saucers, there are 4 perfect trios and both the cake plates are perfect. The sugar basin has a hairline fracture on the base, but it is so rare to find any antique porcelain, let alone something as spectacular as this here we were thrilled to get all the pieces for $80AUD (about 43 pounds) and watched in horror as the assistant insisted in roughly bundling it up in newspaper lest more of the handles broke off!. Someone has obviously paid to have the broken pieces professionally restored at some point so must have known its value once.

 

Kindest regards and best wishes,

Tim Parish (Australia)

As to the history of the set I am afraid I can say very little. My daughter and I were astonished to find it all piled up (sacrilege!) in the window of a second hand shop just 2 days ago and while there has been some old damage to the jug, bowl and 2 of the coffee cups, tea cups and saucers, there are 4 perfect trios and both the cake plates are perfect. The sugar basin has a hairline fracture on the base, but it is so rare to find any antique porcelain, let alone something as spectacular as this here we were thrilled to get all the pieces for $80AUD (about 43 pounds) and watched in horror as the assistant insisted in roughly bundling it up in newspaper lest more of the handles broke off!. Someone has obviously paid to have the broken pieces professionally restored at some point so must have known its value once.

 

Kindest regards and best wishes,

Tim Parish (Australia)